Another Thing of Beauty

There has been a suggestion that perhaps our household has an obsession with Dachshunds. When the household is ruled by Dachshunds its hard for it to be otherwise. Over at Larry Muffin at Home Laurent has outlined pretty much a day in the life of a dachshund at Manoire Hobbs-Beaulieu.

Though it was not always the case, certainly not when Bundnie our first dachsie took over our lives in 1989, these days friends have an easy time of it finding dachshund photos, videos and paraphernalia to send us. We have dachsie tea towels, coasters, mats, knife rests (4 sets), salt and pepper shakers, Christmas ornaments, socks, underwear (you really didn’t need to know that, did you?), cushions, napkins and even a life-sized faux-bronze cast (don’t ask). All appreciated and put to good use. Most recently fellow blogger Debra, She Who Seeks, suggested we needed a steampunk dachsie around the house.

Believe me Debra if I could find this little guy he’d be in our living room right now.

The word for April 1st is:
Dachshund /ˈdäksˌho͝ond,ˈdäksənd/: [noun]
A dog of a short-legged, long-bodied breed.*
German Dachshund (15c.), from Dachs “badger” (Old High German dahs, 11c.), from Proto-Germanic thahsuz “badger,” most likely” borrowed from the same PIE source as the Celtic totemic name Tazgo– (source of Gaulish Tazgo-, Gaelic Tadhg), originally “badger.” Old English hund “dog,” from Proto-Germanic hundaz.
*Totally inadequate as a definition. They forgot stubborn, intelligent, loving, food-centred, wilful, feisty, affectionate, needy, irritating, lovable, photogenic, controlling hellhounds!

Sharing

Looking back I realized it has been a long, long while since I’ve shared anything other than my thoughts with both my faithful readers. Back in the day I’d link up to posts on other blogs and scatter random pictures around. Well Christmastide is a time of sharing and there has been much in Blog Land that’s caught my often unfocused interest.

As to the random photos they are of a visit we made to the Rembrandt House Museum during our stay in Amsterdam in September.

My blog buddy Mitchell’s spouse was complaining about the cold in Málaga when they did a tour of the Christmas lights this past week. Apparently it was a frigid 15c (59f) and poor San Geraldo was freezing. As the temperature here was -15c I had little sympathy for them and even less when I saw Mitchell’s photos of the magnificent light displays.

A left lick on Mitchell’s lead shot on his beautiful photo essay will take you to the full display plus a video. It’s magical.

This brought back memories of our New Year’s in Madrid back in 2010. They certainly know spectacular illumination in Spain.

A few times in the past month or so the Mainland has been cut off from the Island when the winds have been high and the Confederation Bridge has been closed. It can cause problems but nothing like what early Islanders encountered back in the days before the “fixed link” when winters pretty much froze the Northumberland Straits. Over at SailStait historian Harry Holman posted a report from 1876 when a crossing of the nine mile gap took from Sunday to Wednesday with the odd dunking in the process.

A left click on this ice boat pictured in Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly August 1887 to read the tale of Going With The Floe 1876.

This happens to coincide with the announcement of an increase on the toll to cross to the Mainland. It’s going up by .75¢ for a two-axled vehicle, .25¢ for motorcycles and bicycles, and should you wish to walk across the 12.9 km (8 mile) span there is no increase. It remains a mere $4.50.

A student’s cubicle – Rembrandt taught upwards of 50 young painters during his career. He charged his pupils a hefty premium of 100 guilders per year, and sold their works for his benefit. Terms were anywhere from two to seven years depending on the teacher and the abilities of the student.

In a break with a forty-year tradition I did not polish my balls this year. I let Laurent do it! (Oh grow up! Honestly are you still in grade school?) Laurent wrote all about the preparations for Christmastide at the Beaulieu-Hobbs manse.

A left click will take you to Larry Muffin’s account of, amongst other things, ball polishing.

December 13th is Christmas Jumper Day – for those not familiar with the word “jumper” means “sweater” in the United Kingdom. It actually derives from the French jupe – which the French may want back come the new year.

Summer maybe

UA-April2017_ppt-644
The Massacre of the Innocents modelled after Rubens – by Kent Monkman.
Shame and Prejudice – Confederation Centre Art Gallery until September 15, 2018.

I was going to write something about the new Summer Exhibitions at the Confederation Gallery but Laurent has already done so and there is no need to repeat. Both exhibitions are fascinating and the Monkman will need repeated viewings to tease out every message that is in them. A great but disturbing show.

Larry Muffin At Home

We had a funny Winter with little snow, much icy rain, fog and very high winds, our Spring was cold and wet. Yesterday 22 June finally warm weather and warm enough for us to take our Summer clothes out and put the Winter stuff away.  Today is 24 June, Saint Jean Baptiste day in French Canada or La Fête nationale as it is called in Quebec and it is the beginning of the of the week long Canada day celebrations.

This weekend was also the opening of the Summer Show at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, two artists are featured this year, Marlene Creates and Kent Monkman.

Creates has a 40 yr retrospective of her work in 5 parts, she describes herself as an environmental artists and lives in Portugal Cove on the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland on a 6 acres plot of wood land. Her work is about her…

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Books I read lately

I can’t recall what led me to purchase this book but remember finding it a fascinating historical study at the time. Now that Laurent has picked it up off the shelf and read it I’m tempting to go back for a second read.

Larry Muffin At Home

Some years ago Will got a book entitled  ” When London was the Capital of America” by Julie Flavell. The book is the story of colonial America and though we forget it prior to 1776 London was the Imperial Capital of all British North America, it included the 13 original colonies and the territories south, after 1763 it also included all of Canada which had passed from French domination to British after the end of the Seven Year War and the Treaty of Paris.

Flavell debunks a lot of myths about America before 1776 and its white colonists. It was the practice for American colonists especially those with money to send their sons and daughters to London or Geneva for a proper education and to learn manners and etiquette and to become proper gentleman and ladies. This was very important for social status in the American colonies, you could not…

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New Canadian Stamp

Another reason to celebrate Canada.

Larry Muffin At Home

Canada Post unveiled today a new stamp to show that in Canada we have marriage equality and this is enshrined in our Constitution.

canada-150-stamp.jpg

The stamp is in both of Canada’s Official languages, French and English and is shaped like a Maple Leaf with the Rainbow Flag and the Words Canada 150 to mark the Anniversary of Confederation 1867-2017.

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A Beijinger living in Provincetown

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Jerry and I get around. In 2011, we moved from the USA to Spain. We now live near Málaga. Jerry y yo nos movemos. En 2011, nos mudamos de EEUU a España. Ahora vivimos cerca de Málaga.

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