Mercoledi Musicale

A Touch of Irish Music for the Season

I suppose it is the time of year, and possibly the fact that there has been no travel for an extended period of time, that has led me to go back over photos of our trip to Ireland, England and the North Atlantic last September.  That and you are now reading a missive from the newest member of the Benevolent Irish Society of Prince Edward Island – founded in 1825 it is one of the oldest organizations on the Island.  It was established to assist Irish immigrants and as an aid society for families in need.  Today the emphasis is on preserving and presenting Irish history, arts, culture and its heritage here on PEI. A major part of that heritage is a musical one; not the “Irish” music of tin-pan alley or the pseudo-Celtic sounds mingling with the healing potpourri that drifts through your local holistic food shop but the music as it was and is played in the Four Provinces.

I’ve mentioned previously that on our journey on the Grand Hibernian we had entertainment every evening after dinner in the Observation Car.  Traditional artists include a Celtic harpist (from Trois Rivières Quebec????), a local storyteller, The Baileys and a husband and wife duo.  All were exceptionally fine performers but unfortunately Belmond didn’t provide us with the names of the performers and had the Baileys not given us one of their fine discs I would not have been able to give them their credit.

Nan-Tom-Taimin
Nan Tom Teaimin – one of the great Sean-nós singers – at Ard Bia in Galway.

Perhaps the most serious omission when it came to introducing artists was on our visit to Galway and our lunch at Ard Bia.  We were in a private room on the second floor and prior to a splendid lunch begin served a singer was introduced.  Though the room had a country charm it was strangely set up and all angles; this meant that one end of the room could neither see nor hear the lady and the other couldn’t hear the introduction.  That introduction was perfunctory at best , and hardly worthy of Nan Tom Teaimín one of the great singers of Sean-nós or “old style” Irish music.   It is a style of music that I knew only very slightly but have started to investigate more deeply – it is certainly not what most people think of as “Irish” music and many of our fellow travellers were puzzled by her performance.

The first of these three pieces on this clip is a Sean-nós song The Flowereen Bán as sung by Nan Tom Teaimín – unfortunately I haven’t been able to come up with a translation except I do know that “bán” means “white”.  The two pieces that follow are performed by Martin Dowling and are traditional Irish fiddle music: an Air: An raibh tú ag an gcarraig? (Have you been to the rock?) and a reel: The mother’s delight.

As I was writing this I thought of my late brother who, where ever he may be, is chortling and I hope highly pleased at all this.   A chuimhne grámhara mo dheartháir.

On this day in 1888:  the Anglo-Tibetan War of 1888 begins.

Author: Willym

A senior with the heart of a young'un

6 thoughts on “Mercoledi Musicale”

  1. Actually I like this type of traditional music, most people are not aware of it because all they want to know about Ireland is drinking on St. Patrick’s day. I’m really starting to get tired of the drunken Irishman stereotype. Thanks for posting that Will.

    1. Steve

      I will not countenance that stereotype nor the little bloody people all done up in green, nor the false bon ami of the whole St Patrick’s Day thing. It’s a totally false concept created by people who’s knowledge of their homeland is highly suspect.

      I know I’m an old curmudgeon but damn it I’m an Irish curmudgeon!

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